Worn books, hidden paths, striking vistas, and displaced machinery- an accumulation of images from, inspired by, and relevant to the ages of Myst.

shoomlah:



Joel and I have officially Steampunk’d our cubicle.



My coworker brought in his steampunk rifle, so I decided to MYST-ify the rest of the bookshelf!  Naturally.
You can’t see the MYST book itself, but take solace in knowing that it’s hidden back by the light bulb.  Hidden, as all good linking books are.

shoomlah:

Joel and I have officially Steampunk’d our cubicle.

My coworker brought in his steampunk rifle, so I decided to MYST-ify the rest of the bookshelf!  Naturally.

You can’t see the MYST book itself, but take solace in knowing that it’s hidden back by the light bulb.  Hidden, as all good linking books are.

Steampunk Clock XIX | Diarment Creations

(Source: diarment-creations.blogspot.com)

A video of Andrew Smith’s kinetic sculpture in action.

Tornado 3.0 is a seven foot tall “Steampunk” style tornado vortex generator. The vortex can clearly be seen as through the large oval window built into the door. Opening the latch releases the door allowing the viewer to see the tornado with better clarity and even reach into the chamber to disrupt the airflow causing the vortex to “rope out” or disappear. Leaving the airflow alone allows the vortex to re-appear. A large lever on the side of the chamber allows you to control how much airflow actually is exhausted or re-circulated into the chamber, affecting the strength and even the shape of the vortex.

(Source: youtube.com)

Tornado 3.0 | Andrew Smith

Tornado 3.0 is a seven foot tall “Steampunk” style tornado vortex generator. The vortex can clearly be seen as through the large oval window built into the door. Opening the latch releases the door allowing the viewer to see the tornado with better clarity and even reach into the chamber to disrupt the airflow causing the vortex to “rope out” or disappear. Leaving the airflow alone allows the vortex to re-appear. A large lever on the side of the chamber allows you to control how much airflow actually is exhausted or re-circulated into the chamber, affecting the strength and even the shape of the vortex.

HOW WHAT

(Source: flickr.com)

Castellated dial clock, 16th century, Nortwest Europe | Cassiobury Park turret clock, early 17th century, England

(Source: britishmuseum.org)

Weight-Driven Clock, Italy, 16th Century | Gehn’s D’ni timepiece, Age 223

(Source: britishmuseum.org)

Fragments of Light | Andrew Smith, 2008

Fragments of Light functions as an indoor lamp.  Although it looks like there is water within this piece, it is really a solid 8 inch diameter clear acrylic cylinder.  The outside of the cylinder has been crackled with thousands of small cracks that capture the light within the cylinder causing it to glow.  The bottom of the sculpture houses a halogen bulb with a color wheel that slowly changes the color of the light.  In addition to an (on off) switch there is a second switch that stops the color wheel, allowing the lamp to stay in a solid color state.  The color of the lamp cycles through red, blue, green, and yellow. 

(Source: andrewsmithart.com)

shoomlah:

The final, belated result of a commission for my bud Zoë, who wanted me to do a portrait of her special gentleman- the lovely Jacob Strick- in full Myst regalia.
I have next to no time to do commissions in between personal projects and work, but who am I to pass up the chance to draw fellow Myst/Riven/URU enthusiasts in their proper setting? Also I love these guys. <3 <3
-C

Relevant to this blog’s interests, methinks.

shoomlah:

The final, belated result of a commission for my bud Zoë, who wanted me to do a portrait of her special gentleman- the lovely Jacob Strick- in full Myst regalia.

I have next to no time to do commissions in between personal projects and work, but who am I to pass up the chance to draw fellow Myst/Riven/URU enthusiasts in their proper setting? Also I love these guys. <3 <3

-C

Relevant to this blog’s interests, methinks.

Jailers’ Key Guns, 19th century (most)

One of the most odd objects we’ve ever seen these items are sometimes confused with spy gadgetry, but the truth is stranger. Jailers’ keys were apparently filled with gun powder to create a primitive gun that could be detonated if there was any trouble when opening a cell door. We found several original versions that back up this claim, dating from the 17th century and of various complexity.

(Source: oobject.com)