Worn books, hidden paths, striking vistas, and displaced machinery- an accumulation of images from, inspired by, and relevant to the ages of Myst.

River rock planters & bowls | Artefact Design & Salvage 

Something about these is very pleasantly Rivenese to me.

(Source: fab.com)

A video of Andrew Smith’s kinetic sculpture in action.

Tornado 3.0 is a seven foot tall “Steampunk” style tornado vortex generator. The vortex can clearly be seen as through the large oval window built into the door. Opening the latch releases the door allowing the viewer to see the tornado with better clarity and even reach into the chamber to disrupt the airflow causing the vortex to “rope out” or disappear. Leaving the airflow alone allows the vortex to re-appear. A large lever on the side of the chamber allows you to control how much airflow actually is exhausted or re-circulated into the chamber, affecting the strength and even the shape of the vortex.

(Source: youtube.com)

Tornado 3.0 | Andrew Smith

Tornado 3.0 is a seven foot tall “Steampunk” style tornado vortex generator. The vortex can clearly be seen as through the large oval window built into the door. Opening the latch releases the door allowing the viewer to see the tornado with better clarity and even reach into the chamber to disrupt the airflow causing the vortex to “rope out” or disappear. Leaving the airflow alone allows the vortex to re-appear. A large lever on the side of the chamber allows you to control how much airflow actually is exhausted or re-circulated into the chamber, affecting the strength and even the shape of the vortex.

HOW WHAT

(Source: flickr.com)

Greenland National Park, Greenland

Timorese lunch pails | Artefact Design & Salvage

Teak cross sections of Indonesian rice pounders | Artefact Design & Slavage

(Source: fab.com)

abandoned building, photos by Xosé.

Bioluminsecent Phytoplankton - Dinoflagellates

The biological light, or bioluminescence, in the waves is the product of marine microbes called phytoplankton—and now scientists think they know how some of these life-forms create their brilliant blue glow.

The most common type of marine bioluminescence is generated by phytoplankton known as dinoflagellates. A recent study co-authored by Hastings has for the first time identified a special channel in the dinoflagellate cell membrane that responds to electrical signals—offering a potential mechanism for how the algae create their unique illumination.

(Source: National Geographic)

Weight-driven clocks | Italy, 16th century

(Source: gettyimages.co.uk)